Blog

Women to get 33% reservation in paramilitary forces

Rajnath Singh, Union Home Minister, announced on Tuesday that an initiative will be launched to secure 33% seats for women in the paramilitary forces, including Central Industrial Security Force (CISF).

Currently, women share accounts for only 5.04% in the force. The Home Minister said that efforts will be made to make sure that women account for one third of the force. An advisory report has already been sent to all states.

We applaud this initiative of the central government. For equality of men and women to truly exist, women inclusion in all spheres of life is vital—be it the work force, politics or even the security and defence forces.

Source: http://www.firstpost.com/india/women-to-get-33-reservation-in-all-paramilitary-forces-2426242.html

Read more

Celebrating India’s First ever Constitution Day

It is a widely acknowledged fact that India is the largest democracy in the world. So it is only fair that we have the most elaborate constitution aided by a set of legislations that make for a strong well equipped legal framework. Ours is a constitution that provides for all rights necessary for a dignified human life. The efforts of the Constitutional Assembly lead by the ever accomplished Dr. BR Ambedkar, have facilitated us to have a legal system that provides for all we could want. download
The Indian Leaders had declared 26th January 1930 as Purna Swaraj. India attained independence on the 15th of 1947. When the Indian Constitution was completed on 26th November, the Indian National Congress decided to enact the constitution on 26th January to maintain the significance of Purna Swaraj Day.
This year, we as a nation have celebrated the Indian Constitution Day for the first time.

 

Read more

Justice is served

Bano-750x500The year was 2002. The place was Gujarat. The terror came in the form of riots. Bilkis Bano, is one of the few victims who have gotten justice, in the trying times of the 2002 communal riots. On March 3rd, a truck full of 17 people was struggling to find refuge in the riot struck area of central Gujarat. Bilkis Bano was on that truck with her family when that truck was attacked by a 35 group of armed mobsters. In the very next hour, 14 out of the 17 people were murdered, with one of them going as far as smashing a toddler’s head on the rocks. The toddler, was snatched out of her mother’s arms and murdered, while her mother, Bilkis Bano was assaulted and raped by 3 men, namely Govind Nai, Jaswant Nai and Naresh Kumar. Thought to be dead, she was dumped in the bushes by her offenders. Hours after regaining consciousness, Bilkis found a rag, covered her nakedness and found refuge with a tribal community. Her case was pursued by the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) and they made sure that justice was delivered to the victims and their families. Bilkis Bano expressed her plight that she couldn’t even tell the criminals that she was pregnant and beg for mercy, as they had their feet over her mouth, in her deposition, and described the trauma she went through. She had known the men who raped her all her life. She had sold milk to them. They were her customers. It still befuddles her to think that the people she had known, had hurled sexual abuses at her and had scarred her for life. But not one to back down, Bilkis fought against her oppressors and made sure they got what they deserved. The trial ended in the conviction of 13 out of the 20 accused men, and Bilkis finally got justice. Upon hearing the news of conviction of the rapists, Bilkis spoke in a voice bereft of any emotion that she can never forgive them. However, her faith in the judiciary has been revived and she believes that somewhere justice can succeed. The murderers had buried the bodies themselves after the carnage ended. Upon the exhumation of the bodies, huge traces of salt was found in the soil, as the mobsters thought that it would help decompose the bodies sooner and take the tale of their crimes with them. As karma strikes, the salt mixed the humid content of the soil ended up preserving the bodies for a longer period, forming rock solid evidence for their conviction.

Read more

I Am Still Human Goes International : Thanks to Anna Wagner

Today I am still human has started it’s international activities in Germany. Anna Wagner, who is a member of I Am Still Human, has successfully done this activity.  This shows that she has a Golden Heart as she donated all her old clothes to the homeless people and to people who where in need of some clothes. It’s amazing to see people like her helping others unconditionally. We would like to take this oppurutnity to Thank Her for this wonderful gesture and Supporting I Am Still Human.

20151125124707

Read more

Courage stronger than Acid

The 26 year old acid victim Laxmi hails as an inspiration not just for Indians but also people all around the world. Laxmi was just 16 years old when she was attacked by a 32 year old man who had developed feelings for her. She had rejected him and as revenge, he destroyed her beautiful face. But she did not let this bring her down, she knew the pain accompanied with an acid attack and thus wanted to make sure that nobody else would have to suffer through the same. She filed a petition to regulate acid sales in the Supreme Court and was successful in her endeavour. She also made sure that the culprits in both her and another victim’s case were severely punished.maxresdefault

What Laxmi did was open people’s eyes towards the situation of various acid attack victims and the danger of being a victim in our society. She remained optimistic and joyful even in these disheartening days. She has gotten past it alll and achieved all she wanted to achieve, not giveing up hope. She fought for what she believed was right and there is nothing more commendable than that.

After the attack, Laxmi believed that she would end up alone and never find a life partner. That was until she met Alok Dixit who understood her pain better than anyone else. Alok and Laxmi decided to be in a live in relationship and not get married because they believe that their marriage will be attended by people due to curiosity about  Laxmi rather than any real concern for their happiness.  Both their families have accepted their decision to not have a ceremonial wedlock.  They have also been recently blessed with a baby girl named Pihu. Laxmi was apprehensive in the beginning that maybe her daughter would be scared of her but little Pihu also smiles happily whenever she sees her mother.Pihu-750x5001

Laxmi has shown to the world as a whole that you cannot let the past bring you down.  While Laxmi is the object of stares and comments every time she steps out of the house, she does not let it affect her. Even Alok has accepted that he was deeply attracted by her courage more than anything.

Even though she was just an innocent girl, a mere 16 years, when the incident occurred, she pushed through it boldly and has taught us all the lessons of life. She is and will remain to be an inspiration to all.

Read more

Take Me Somewhere

Take me somewhere, somewhere where no one’s ever been seen,
where the sea is languid and the knolls are a different green,
where the glittering night sky is the only guide,
and where chasing fireflies helps in your stride.
Take me there, there where the sand is ivory white,
where at night to warn the ships, yonder the house shines its light,
where not a soul nor a heavenly spirit roves,
and the hues embellishing the heavens has been an amalgamation of mauves.
Take me anywhere, anywhere where the roads run long and the climb is steep,
where the shanties are abandoned and the sun makes you crawl and creep,
where solitude and desolation fill you with a new ecstasy,
and never did you dream or draw and have such a fantasy.
Take me someplace, someplace where the cherry blossom trees never end,
where time seems to stop no matter how much time you spend,
where the dappled sunlight and the azure of dawn,
makes your heart want to stay and never be gone.
Take me this place, this place which lingers in my dreams,
where the snow-caped mountains melt away in clear gushing streams,
where the scenery is speckled with black and white sheep,
and harvesting just ceased, to behold piles of stalk in a heap.
Take me any place, any place where no one’s ever set foot and its serene,
where water-falls fade into a glistening mist so pristine,
where peacocks and larks dance in jubilation,
and the spirit wanders away unaware of consternation.
Take me away, away where the winds run astray,
where the conifers and prayer flags mark my way,
where solace and zen are all I seek,
and somewhere above my Lord contemplates on a peak.
Take me now, now because I’ve packed my bags,
where hurry is no word and I’m tired of the nags,
where the sun never sets and nature never hesitates to be an inspiration,
and there’s no money on me, but that’s no impediment to reach my destination.
– Trisha Sharma
This poem is symbolic of the desires of a young child whose life is confined to the four walls of his concrete world. His life is numbed with the plague of bland surroundings and a humdrum routine which he does not fancy anymore. He yearns to let go and break free, to shun away all his responsibilities and run away from all the chores he has to fulfill to do justice to his role in the society. Yet, that’s not what his heart calls out to do, his spirit wants to roam free, breathe the sunlight and chase the wind and experience the world beyond with all it’s magnificent treasures. He wants to run away, as far as possible from humanity and the “over-technological world”, to brace the earth in its rawness and pristine wonder. It doesn’t matter to him whether he has any money with him or not, as far as he is concerned, its not the material aspects during the journey that he wishes to conquer, rather the beauty of nature that he wishes to seek. He wishes to live in the lap of God’s natural gifts and his soul aches to roam the bounties of surroundings that he does not see everyday. He wishes to break the chains that tie him and escape away into the infinite places that await him, greedy in wanderlust and craving for adventure.
Read more

#IAmMoreThan

“All that glitters is not gold”, which ever person invented this proverb knew its real worth and applicability in human life. It’s one of the innumerable rules of the universe that a human’s outer shell should not be a determinant of what they possess inside of their core and what they have been through because not everything on the outside reflects the trials and tribulations that have been faced on the inside. “A book should never be judged by its cover” could not hold greater relevance in this context because what a person may appear on the exterior may not be what he or she has experienced or is experiencing in the interior.

The entire world has seen this lady grow, right from a little baby to this 18 year old adult, whose every big and small move is caught on tape whether regarding fashion statements, dinner dates, award functions, off-duty styles, cosmetic renewals, etc., and are scrutinized closely by the media and the whole world at large. Kylie Jenner, the youngest of the Kardashian sisters’ life is like an online journal, with every little detail being reported and projected to the whole globe, filling gossip columns and providing daily new to the online news websites and blogs. Not only every American but also every other person of the world who is familiar with and frequents social media like instagram, twitter, etc., would be envious of her bank account and alleged boyfriend, Tyga, thinking her life to be perfect and fairy-tale like and presuming she has nothing to fret as she and her sisters are famous enough to sustain the next ten generations to come.

However, this is far from what the reality has been. Kylie, who is a religious updater of snapchat and instagram, revealed on the former app that she has been bullied ever since she was nine years old saying, “I’ve been bullied since I was nine…from the whole world, it feels like sometimes”. Donning best of the best Yves Saint Laurent, Balmain, Valentino, etc., dresses and bags is no consolation to the fact that the whole world is judging and shaming you constantly for the littlest of the little things that you might speak or look like in your worst days and your worst times. After all, beneath all that glamour and those much talked about lips, she is just an ordinary girl going through the same problems as everyone of her age is. However, there is a twist in the tale, instead of all this making her feel conscious about herself and her body, she has taken the bullying in her stride and used it as a stepping stone to become a more strong and emancipated women who is confident enough to accept herself and be comfortable in her own skin. At the end of the day, no matter how many fake lashes she might add to her eyes in the day or no matter how many haters might make mean and sadistic comments below her photographs and videos on various social media, she has made peace with the person she actually is and believes that those who accept bullying are the ones who perpetuate it.

This has led her to start an anti-bullying campaign “#IamMoreThan” on the social networking site, instagram, so as to make all the other people who have been similarly bullied or shamed to come up to a public platform through her profile as she is the eighth most followed celebrity on instagram and pour out the stories of their trials and tribulations and how they overcame them to become people of substance and inner-worth, rather than only objects of exterior beauty and outer-glow. Her campaign has become very popular on the site and has given several young people world-wide, the opportunity to freely discuss and relate to each other’s experiences of traumatic bullying, be it in any form, and has given them the confidence to voice their disgust and contempt against this practice and to put an end to actual and cyber bullying that has nowadays come to be in vogue. Kylie Jenner has proved to be much more than just a reality T.V. star and socialite through this genuine and laudable act of hers.

Read more

The Invisible Language

The Invisible Language 2

In these fast-moving times of the twenty first century, looking up at the sky will only make you see frozen smiles of famous strangers—loud, flamboyant advertisements propositioning you to try on a new version of the same carbonated drink or brighten up your skin with a ‘miracle’ product. It is an age where every Indian faces the tug and pull between the traditional and the modern but one thing manages to confront you on every corner—the English language.

English has pervaded India at all levels—primary, secondary and tertiary. The Indian Constitution, the bulwark and essence of our democracy, was written in English. English is the main medium of education in nearly all schools of India. Shop signs and board signals speak the same language. Indians themselves seemed to be suffering from some sort of language confusion or ‘Hinglish’ where they don’t seem to speak either English or Hindi but a diluted mix of both.

The Invisible Language 3

Hindi, on the other hand, seems to be folding onto itself and disappearing slowly. It’s ethnic, distinct essence seems to be slowly losing its identity to the universality of English and Indians do nothing but sit back and watch as they lose one of the threads connecting them to their past and ancestors. It is sad and unfortunate that most students today find Hindi difficult to learn and study whereas they adopt English readily, preferring the ease it affords them. They prefer to speak a jumble of English phrases and common Hindi, simultaneously disrespecting and diluting the purity of both languages.

Hindi is a beautiful language. It has its own distinctive, lyrical lilt that blooms when it is spoken with the reverence it deserves. The verses of Harivansh Rai Bacchan, Jaishankar Prasad, Munshi Premchand and Mahadevi Verma, among many others, are surviving tribute to the soul of the Hindi Language. Urdu is Hindi’s beautiful cousin, furnishing works from the likes of Mirza Ghalib and Amir Khusro, works that enflame the mind as well as the spirit.

This is not a call to reject English. As the world grows smaller, English serves instrumental in the bid to bring different people together and brighten the face of this planet with lines of connectivity and unity. It also stands to reason that English is a gorgeous language in itself and that should be reason enough to study it. However, it is a call to change the way we speak and communicate with languages today. It is call to readers across the country to speak each language the way it should be, different from each other, alone in their beauty and grace.

The fact that it is ironic that the article was written in English does not escape. As they say, the battle is half won when one recognizes one’s vulnerabilities and makes an effort to change them. The night light is on and the papers set and as we work to strengthen the weak links in our Hindi, we hope that you do too.

The Invisible Language

 

Read more

Germany Assumes Itself to be the Next Target After Paris

The terror – fear is changing germany It was the night of fear The country football match germany vs the Netherlands in hannover should be a sign of freedom after the attacks of paris, a little bit normality for the everyday life. But because of a terror alert the match been cancelled. On this call from the interior minestry of hannover at 7:07 pm were talked only two words “STOP NOW!” Details of the anti-terror-input were spoken from the police president. Over 2000 policeman and special forces stoped more than 300 cars and controlled them without finding something dangerous. After the warning of the terror fear were more than this cars were controlled.

Read more

Standing Up Against Domestic Violence

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: One of the crimes which is responsible for the most number of broken families and homes in India. It is one thing for a woman to bear with it, a totally different thing for her to escape from those evil clutches. But what do you do, how do you react when the victim in question is a young teenager? It is  oe thing about escaping the nightmare, another thing choosing to publicly speaking about it.
That is exactly what young Megha* decided to do. Megha is from one of the underprivileged families of the Sikligar community in Pune, Maharashtra. It was while interning at Ashraya Initiative for Children which is an NGO that provides education and other basic amnesties to the Sikligar and Waghri communities in Pune that she came to our notice. She is one of the students in AIC’s Education Outreach Programme, and quite a bright young lady, if I do say so myself. Megha was a student in the Education Programme from 2007-2012 when her parents secretly arranged her marriage. At that time, Megha was in Class X and her sister became a child bride too. She was only in Class VI.
Knowing that the marriage would be illegal according to Indian law, their parents kept the plan under wraps and one fine day, the girls simply stopped coming to class. At the time that the wedding was being planned, Megha was just months away from being the first Sikligar girl to complete her higher secondary education. Instead, her life took a tragic turn. Her husband was violent, used to beat her often, drink and gamble, never earned any money and had even been imprisoned before. She became pregnant and her husband threatened her by brandishing knives at her saying that he only wanted a son and should she deliver a daughter, he’d kill the child. She had to be admitted at the end of her pregnancy and doctors foretold that unless her blood pressure was controlled, there would be complications. The in-laws did not listen and refused to admit her to the hospital. She did deliver a son, but things were far from over. There were constant demands for dowry and at one point; her mother had to give her her own mangalsutra (gold necklace worn as a sign of being a married woman). After a few days, her mother herself saw the man hitting her daughter. Not only did he hit Megha but also hit her mother and banged the door on his 14-day-old son. For six months after that, Megha stayed with her parents.
The in-laws came back and promised that things would be better from now and took Megha back with them. However, that was not to be. After a few days wherein everything was fine, things went back to square one. He threatened to kill her and even attempted to do so once by coming up from behind her and hitting her with an iron weighing scale. The time that he beat her mother, they lodged a police complaint. Megha and her family tried to lodge a complaint of attempt to murder but the police refused to lodge any other complaint other than that of domestic violence.
She returned to her parents’ house in May, and has vowed never to return to her husband again. She found out that she was pregnant again and has decided to try and give her children a life that she never had. She is continuing her education at the AIC Education Outreach Programme. In addition to attending 10th Standard classes in preparation for her board examinations next spring, she has also started working as a classroom instructor which helps her earn a small stipend so she can look after herself and her son.
Based on the experiences that I have had, I can say one thing with certainty: I will not give my children a life like mine…My dream is that my children will be different from all other Sikligars. I will not impose any of their rules and restrictions on my children and I will encourage them to study a lot. I will definitely give them the love of both a mother and a father, and after they’re grown they’ll feel nothing but pride that their mother overcame such obstacles to raise them. I have faith that I can do a good job caring for them by myself. I will study and make something of my life, and I will give my children the best education possible. If my second child is a girl, I won’t raise her like I was brought up. I won’t have her life controlled by rules and restrictions. And I’ll raise my daughter exactly as I will raise my son. I’ll give both the best educations possible and a good upbringing.
Domestic Violence 1
*Names have been changed to protect the person’s privacy.
Read more